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Phone Book Games

Did you know that people actually still use the phone book? I was having a conversation
the other day with my brother, and he said he hadn’t used one in YEARS! Well, I do
still use one, as not every local business has a web site and doesn’t always appear
on search results. Anyway, since a lot of kids are growing up not knowing HOW to use one,
why not give them a little extra knowledge, teaching them about it, while playing a game
at the same time? Phone book games can actually be fun!

The game that we’ve played a couple times is similar to a treasure or scavenger hunt.
Basically, we think of a certain type of business and try to find it in the Yellow
Pages. The trick is to remember that – for example – “bars” are sometimes found under
“taverns” or “pubs”, depending on where you live. Just as with a card catalogue in a
library, there will be some cross-referencing and dead-ends. But that only adds to the
hunt. (how much would we learn if we succeeded at everything the first time?)

Yes, Google is great. So is Bing. And Yahoo! But the big dogs can only take us so far,
especially when you consider many “Mom and Pop” stores that just aren’t willing to
take their business to the Other World of the Internet. Without at least some basic
skills in using a phone book, our kids aren’t going to have all of the searching and
exploring tools that they may need when they get older.

Making a game out of it is a great way to teach them the ropes.

This post is written by Ellen, who enjoys writing, loves quality time with her family and has created several ready to print scavenger hunts in her spare time.

New Party Ideas

Are you financially strapped and need a party within your budget? Are you sick of throwing the typical party? I know most parties that I have had for my kids I can’t think of enough ways to keep them entertained. And the last thing I want is for my kids to have a boring party. SO, saying that I have a new refreshing idea. Why not have a scavenger hunt party?! The children are occupied from the get go and their minds are in constant motion. They are using their imagination and it definitely beats paying for 10+ kids to get into a skating rink.

These days you don’t even have to be creative to make a successful scavenger hunt. There are websites out there that will literally build your hunt for you. How cool is that? I know I am not the most clever or artistic person out there and I definitely don’t have time for mini projects.

You can even theme your scavenger hunt. You don’t have to always make treasure hunt maps or have buried treasures as their final destination. Switch it up. Make it for girls by having the girls be Barbies in search for their Ken dolls that you hid. Make it for boys and have them searching for the evil villain’s hiding spot. The ideas are really endless and they are all going to grab a child’s attention. It helps them build teamwork and it is fun. Save yourself the money and start building your next scavenger hunt today!

This post is written by Ellen, who enjoys writing, loves quality time with her family and has created several ready to print scavenger hunts in her spare time.

Riddle Clues

Kindergarten Scavenger Hunts

It’s cold outside, and you imagine yourself to be that wiggly five-year-old stuck inside the kindergarten classroom in January. Why not welcome your young learners back to school with this version of a scavenger hunt idea? By now you are poignantly aware of the writing requirements for kindergarteners if you are a teacher in the public school system. An effective way to firm up those sight words the students have been learning and meet writing goals is a scavenger hunt to find them. In a class of twenty, divide into five groups of four. If you are using twenty sight words, laminate four sets using five different colors such as red, green, blue, purple, and orange. Each team of four must find all twenty sight words in their predetermined team color. This is such a great learning game because the clues can be illustrated with the text written as well. For example clue one for finding the word like may be a picture of the author’s chair on a purple card with the words: “on the author’s chair” written under the illustration. Clue two given for finding my, for example, may read: “in the reading loft.” Of course everyone is familiar with these hot spots in the classroom by now, so the pictures serve as excellent clues by themselves. The lead teacher and the paraprofessional can facilitate the game by each taking turns helping teams. To ensure success, the balancing of each team with students representing several reading levels may be predetermined by the teacher. When all the teams have found their clues, a lively discussion of all the directional words could follow referring to clues that used under, over, behind, beside, between, before, and around. Ask, “Who found a clue beside the teacher’s desk?” As you can see, this game will become a favorite for your students and you as success in reading and writing will be gained from its use.

This post is written by Ellen, who enjoys writing, loves quality time with her family and has created several ready to print scavenger hunts in her spare time.

Riddle Clues

Ordinal and Cardinal Numbers

Why not plan a scavenger hunt for the first day back from vacation for kindergarteners who need to know ordinal and cardinal numbers? Try working with a small group in order to engage young learners in conversation over the cardinal numbers. For example your first clue is: find the number one under the teacher’s desk. Under the teacher’s desk is the second clue leading to the number two clue found inside the scissor box. The third clue may lead to number three which is beside the fig tree. Clue number four, or the fourth clue, is found hanging over the bookshelf in the reading corner. What a wonderful and exciting way to engage the children in fun verbiage using ordinal and cardinal positioning! Note the directional words as well. January will be so much more fun when the children are moving about and no longer clueless about ordinal, cardinal, or directional!

This post is written by Ellen, who enjoys writing, loves quality time with her family and has created several ready to print scavenger hunts in her spare time.